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History's Stories, Today's Storytellers, Winter 2024

Object Type: Folder
In Folder: Past Exhibits



Title
Description
Date

“Rhode Island Fishing” I decided to choose this image of a fisherman because my dad is really into fishing and he got me into it as well and I just loved how big the fish looks next to him. I added aspects of RI fishing and oysters and squid, as well as a quahog. He is placed on a map of Rhode Island bay and sea areas.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I chose to focus my work of art on the modern Rhode Island state flag and to use ceramic and painted canvas as my materials. This choice stems from my love for anchor symbolism, and how the flag takes and utilizes that, with the ‘Hope’ banner displayed on the bottom. The history of the flag is a rather short one, but it is one that I am proud to have nonetheless. I wanted to do the flag’s anchor especially, because of how unchanged it’s remained since its conception. Every iteration of the flag dons an anchor, front and center, and I wanted to focus on that in particular. By choosing to create a ceramic piece, I could add more dimension to the art, both literally and metaphorically. Because there’s always been an anchor for Rhode Island, and because it’s so prominent in our culture, I wanted the ceramic piece to be the most pronounced part, almost as if it’s popping out of the page. When choosing paint colors, I wanted the anchor itself to shine and reflect the light, as hope has shone its light on us. So, rather than the yellow that it’s depicted in on the flag, the piece was painted golden. I also chose to give the canvas board a golden border, as to accentuate it and give more detail to the rest of the project. When the viewer looks at my piece, I want them to see how much hope the anchor has given us, and the importance of how much it has remained unchanged. While time is an inherent, unstoppable, changing thing, the Rhode Island anchor has persisted despite it. Because as much as we've always had an anchor on the flag, we’ve always had hope.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“The burning of the First Unitarian Church of Providence” I chose this image because there is a mystery and tragedy of it that resonated with me. Also, the symmetry and detail of the image appealed to me.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Dutch Luthier Printing Press” Inspiration: I was inspired by Jim Dine, an artist who did tools and machines.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Hunter in the 60s” I chose to illustrate a piece about nature because the relationship between humans and nature fascinates me. Pheasant hunting was common in the 1950’s, the time during which the photograph of the hunter was taken.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

Carissa Sharp

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I chose to depict the Rhode Island state house, how it looked originally in the past, and how it looks now. I chose this subject because I really wanted to display the difference between the past and the present, how we've changed so much but still are the same, and I decided that the main fixture of our state would display that the best. I knew I wanted a contrast between the material choice and between the colors, so I chose charcoal and gouache and colored pencils to display that difference. I decided that grayscale charcoal would showcase the feeling of age and history, and that mixed media of gouache and colored pencils would make the colors pop and make the scene look more modern. I also chose to display my pieces on a gray colored paper that was burnt around the edges too better showcase the feeling of age. I hope the viewer will reflect on the difference between the past and present when they look at my piece. People have always existed, always lived and loved and cried, it doesn't matter if their pictures are in black and white or in full color. We're the same species in the same world, just different people in different times.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“The Great City of Providence” I chose to do the building of Providence because when I think about Rhode Island, I think big city, as we’re a small state with large features. So, seeing my doodles overcoming the large scale building was what really felt like me.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Death in the Water” I was inspired by the hurricane of 1938. It was responsible for a total of 564 deaths and $306 million in damages.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

There’s an eerie feeling that surrounds outdate mental institutions. Mainly because the practices that were performed on patience were horribly inhumane. The electric shock operation was an extremely popular “remedy”. This piece of artwork shows a woman casually accepting the pain that comes along with waves of electricity hitting her body.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I figured Lieutenant Dudingston’s injuries must have hurt, so I wanted to portray his emotions in the moment in my art. He definitely shed a tear. Watercolor, Colored pencil on paper

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

State Fire Manuals. Collaged Documents and Paint

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Boy with Horseshoe Crab” I chose to draw this image because the little boy’s face of pure joy reminded me of my childhood having been born and raised near the ocean. Such a small moment, yet so full of emotion, that I’m sure many RI kids can relate to.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

Inspired by “The Gaspee’s Chase”. Chalk and Oil Pastel on paper.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I chose to create this piece because I am inspired by the figures who made women’s suffrage possible in Rhode Island, and the opportunities that this movement continues to provide all Rhode Island women to this day.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Attack on Providence” My project doesn’t really have a deep meaning. It can be summed up with the fact that the archive photo was interesting and I like big radioactive lizards. Really wish I had more to say about it, but that’s all that needs to be said.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

Pen on paper

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

Reese Murdock

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“My Dress” I decided on mixed media for this project because I wanted to express movement in her dress. I loved her expression of happiness and wanted to convey how she might have felt wearing the dress.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

For my art piece, I knew I wanted to do a flip book that would allow a viewer to look into the past. I looked at many under-represented communities in Rhode Island such as women and the lower class. I chose to do the black community in RI due to the history of slavery and abuse that goes untaught. My hope is that viewers will flip through it and learn about their past, even though we are the smallest state we still have a vast history to learn about.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I wanted to celebrate successful African Americans in Rhode Island’s history and their achievement in a white mans world. This message is important to me as a young woman of color.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

The Cathedral of Saints Peter & Paul, Providence RI. Glazed Earthenware

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

“Independent Woman” My piece was inspired by the fact that the original design for the Independent Man was a woman. I aimed to convey the concept of female erasure throughout history.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

I chose women’s history and suffrage because, as a woman, it is extremely important to learn and advocate about women’s history, especially in Rhode Island. Alice Paul had the honor of sewing on each star to a flag as each state in the United States passed the 19th Amendment law. As presented, she is sewing on Rhode Island’s star with historical documents collaged in the background in the shape of the state. The historical documents contain the history of the 19th Amendment being passed and the fight for it. The coffee-stained paper brings a whole new uniqueness to the collage as well. I hope the work I have made makes the viewer feel proud and represented by the outcome of Rhode Island and the 19th Amendment. I also hope they appreciate the different amounts of materials used to show depth: collage with coffee stain, colored pencil, and felt sheets.

4/22/24, 7:17 PM

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